Primitive Star

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Frequently Asked Questions...

Why primitive star did not turn into Black hole?

They say that a black hole is created when a very large star dies and shrinks under its own gravitational force. Now the material inside the primitive star from which Big Bang was started would have had necessary mass and hence Gravity to form a Black Hole. Why did this primitive star not turn into a Black Hole then. Why, instead of blasting out, it did not try to ONLY eat in everything which comes its way?
They say that a black hole is created when a very large star (of over 500 Solar Masses) dies and shrinks under its own gravitational force. Now the material inside the primitive star, from which Big Bang was started would have had necessary mass and hence Gravity, to form a Black Hole. Why did this primitive star not turn into a Black Hole then? Why, instead of blasting out, it did not try to ONLY eat in everything which comes its way? If the mass of primitive star was millin time more than 500 solar masses why did it not turn into black hole?


Best Answer...

Answer:

Your idea of black hole formation is essentially correct, except the star starts with a mass over about 25 times the mass of the sun. After it collapses, if the degenerate core is a few times greater than our sun's mass, gravity is greater than its internal pressure and it continues to collapse. The reason people think the mass gets concentrated into a singularity (it may not be, but we need a quantum theory of gravity, which doesn't yet exist!) is because space-time is so bent that light can't escape. That means that all matter within a certain radius must travel AT THE SPEED OF LIGHT (relative to a distant observer) just to remain stationary (relative to the star). Einstein said that would require an infinite amount of energy. So that means no matter can remain stationary within the star - it must continue to collapse. That's a direct consequence of relativity.

The "Big Bang" is another story. In fact, the name is pretty bad. It wasn't a "bang" at all. It was the beginning of space-time. Outside the Big Bang, there was no space-time - the "bang" was the expansion of space-time into what was previously "nothing". So space-time couldn't be bent, if it didn't yet exist. When it came into existence, there was no matter - only some form of energy. And it isn't clear if there was gravity yet - the force is actually carried by particles called Gravitons. So you can't relate today's physics to the time shortly after the "Big Bang". Most of the physical laws that we know today would not have come into being yet.

I hope I've answered your question, and not confised things too much. It's a very fundamental question, and one which no one has all the answers to. But I've tried to summarize our current state of understanding of the problem. Continue to ask those interesting questions!